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24, 2012. we will begin this morning with your thoughts on religion and politics. as a religion influence your political decisions? also send us your tweet if you go to -- we will begin with the sunday review section of the "the new york times" yesterday. we want to get your take on this. it does religion influence your politics? with more people saying they are unaffiliated. we want to get your take. here are some comments from facebook this morning. what are your thoughts on this december 24, 2012. it does religion influence your politics? let me show you this from "the new york times" this morning. a new poll out worldwide religion shows up that one out of six follows no religion. that is worldwide. all religions outside the united states as well. the upi story. religious identity affect voter choice. and then on the 2012 election, here is the pew forum on religion and public policy -- dorothy and baltimore, maryland. independent caller. what do you think? does religion influence your politics? caller: it does influence me somewhat but not so much now -- this time
. [applause] >> coming up, george will talks about the relationship between religion and u.s. politics and then a hearing on terrorist abuse of refugee programs. >> tomorrow, we will talk about the latest on the so-called fiscal cliff with the joshua gordon of the concord coalition. that is followed by a look of president obama's second term. our guest is david jackson. and then what is next for iraq. we're joined by author michael gordon. live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> they started to get worried in 1774. the british diplomats were reporting to the crown that the colonists were sending ships and trying to get ammunition and cannons. this was after the british had sent more troops after the boston tea party. it is clear they were pulling together ammunition. maybe they did not intend to use it. that was a debate. the kings basically prohibited british ships from taking ammunition and everything to the colonies, unless it was officially sanctioned. they were very alert to this. as soon as the colony's a found out about it, in new hampshire and then rhode island, the militia took ove
. >> cinematic columnist george will talks about the relationship between religion and politics. then it james taylor -- james taylor in his recent appearance at the national press club. later, the life of senator robert byrd. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i came down edl was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i went to work for john lindsay, but i would not work for him at republican headquarters. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york and a woman thought this is really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsay. i got an early start on my political work consulting career. she said that is so cute. she hands me a box of what looked to be pastry, all white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters and the open it up, and there were all these donuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics. >> tuesday night, david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. that is followed at 9:30 with all five of new hampshire is all woman delegation. then, growing up at the white h
between religion and politics. james taylor and his recent appearance at the national press club. later, michelle obama shows children the white house holiday decorations. >> by the time i was 9 years old, i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party. i went to work for john lindsay, who was running as mayor for new york. i was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york. some woman thought this was soberly cute -- was really cute and she asked me why. i made the case against his opponent. she said, that is so cute. she hands me a box of -- zero white box with strain. i ticket back to the liberal party headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a wad of $10 bills. one of my early lessons you can keep the doughnuts. >> obama campaign strategist david axelrod on his life and journalism and politics. at 10:45, the groin that in the white house -- growing up in the white house. >> george will spoke recently at washington university in st. louis about the role of religion and politics. the speech was h
not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get in line with everybody else. with respect, i disagree with what you just said. the religious right, which i obviously am not a member, rose after the religious left in the form of the reverend martin luther king and jesse jackson, etc., etc. the religious right was provoked into politics. the tradition among many protestants was political quietism. and then the supreme court decided that the constitution required that there be at exclusion of religion from the public square in the removal of prayer from schools. deeply offended a great many americans. 40 years ago, next month, they delivered the final provocation for the legitimate political purpose of trying to save the
, religions, cultures, everything you can think of. we do not want to lose that identity of our own history regardless of where our forefathers have come from. i want everybody to be proud to of the language of their forbearers, the religion, the history, the culture, and the arts. again, i do not want us to lose our identity and the community in this great nation. again, thank you very much to the members of the boards for this wonderful gift bestowed upon me, and let's go ahead to continue to hit the ball park -- hit the ball at the ballpark. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, we will bring up our founder to say a few last words. we would like to ask all of the previous speakers to come up for a photograph. it is the hard work of these board members -- without their hard work, none of this would happen. thank you to everyone. >> we would also like for the judicial officers in the audience to come up as well. if you are a sponsor, please come on up. we will ask the founder to speak a few words. ladies and gentlemen, we will start our cultural program after words. food
it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this through enforcement alone. this is a culture that tolerates this and in too many ways promotes it. as tom mentioned we have an unprecedented partnership not just between our agencies but agencies across the federal government that the president has convened to bring our best resources and minds to bear to do something about it. there is now a web site, where a tool kit is being developed and these kinds of best practices are being promo
, very polarizing charter, defines a lot of the basic human value like treatment woman of religion, freedom of expression, so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. however, we would have to take it from there and i think that we treat that constitution try to get another assembly to work, that is not polarizing but establish a consensus among the two divided fraction of the society. right now we have educated middle class on one camp and the so-called islamists and majority of the illiterate part on the other side. that's not the way we expected after the uprising. we need a charter that unifies people that not talking about controversial issues like role, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, freedom of worship but talk about science, technology, health care, that is what people compare about. we are going through difficult time that the economy is falling apart, standard and poor downgraded us to a d minus. not in the greatest shape. we need to see a way to move forward. but it is difficult time right now. >> ifill: but if these numbers hold, it looks like pretty sign
religion, but particularly islam, there's not always a clear understanding to what the first amendment guarantees, which is the right to teach about a religion but not proselytize about it. i think there's fear of associating with anyone associated with islam. there are events outside our control that creates more interest and unfortunately also makes people more afraid. one of the programs we are about to launch is putting all our content online so a teacher in north dakota where there are no muslim, potentially, no expert can come to her classroom, they can go to our web site and download the content and teach the things we are teaching. >> i think partnerships are the best way to overcome the limitations because we all have limitations. and sometimes it's just visibility. we actually have on our web site 50 short films and one of them is a muslim student from a school in fremont going to a school in arinda talking about what it's like going to school as a muslim in the united states and they are asking questions and you see we are all kids in school and we have more similaritie
of religion and the right to practice how we choose. and according to some of this year's recent polls, nearly 60% of the general public finding religion very important in their life. you can look at this poll here on your screen. and our next guest has spent some time reflecting both about faith and politics. fox news contributor juan williams is with us from dc with his analysis. good morning to you. >> good morning, ainsley. merry christmas. >> ainsley: merry christmas to you. so i recently was watching one of the morning shows and i saw joel osteen, the pastor from texas, being interviewed by a local morning anchor and he was asking about his faith and he said -- and then about politics. and he said i try not to talk about politics because it divides people. but you, juan, you have a way -- i know you're very faithful, but you also talk about politics and it's injure job. so how do you set faith into -- fit faith into politics? >> for the whole of america and american politics, religion is oftentimes been i think a centerpoint and not always positive, which is why i hesitated and some pol
nihilism or atheism. the first amendment, congress shall make no law to establish religion or their free exercise thereof. in other words, stay out of it. obviously it assumes -- and there is god. we knew what the religions were. the baptist conventions, they weren't like worshiping a pope. they believed in god. i'm not going to revise history. i grew up in a religious environment and i'm proud of it. i am proud of it but i thank god i believe in god or i would probably be enormously angry right now. so they i am grateful and unapologetic. >> one interesting sort of -- it is remarkable when we started talking a little bit about how the sub by this change over time and we could have could've also edit the 19th amendment, women becoming part of this ever greater ark of democratic inclusion. >> and prohibition. i will drink to that. [laughter] >> but that was repealed. in general most of the amendments, as you said before, maybe more perfect. >> or less perfect perk is. >> but then we got rid of it. >> i don't drink so i understand. [laughter] >> on revision is pretty extraordinary, the con
. they should be able to train without having religion forced on them. joining me with reaction is executive director for the dr. ron cruise who is a retired army chaplain. good morning to you, sir. >> thank you for having me. >> gretchen: we see a situation in west point. one cadet who was an athiest felt uncomfortable with taking part in involuntary prayer, your reaction. >> it is a shame we don't respect the pluralism. can prayer in west point went back from the founding of our country and we need to respect the religious beliefs of all. those who believe and those who don'tment those who believe have every right to prayer and those who don't believe opt out of the prayer. we need to remember that our founding fathers, george washington upon his appointment as commander-in-chief in the army. one of his first acts was to ask congress to authorize chaplains in every brigade so that religious services could be held. prayer is fundament will in the lives of our soldiers from the beginning of our country and west point would do well to resist efforts by athleast advocates. >> i read a portion
fundamentally, you know, it has a lot to do with morality and religion and the fact that the forces -- it has become more and more acceptable in our society to have children out of wedlock, in particular, in the african-american community. it is too bad. >> social science does show anything, it is the correlation between two parent families and achievement? >> absolutely. that was also politically incorrect to say for a long time. that is the reason one daniel patrick moynihan pointed out this problem in the 1960s come he got such a firestorm of criticism. his brave as he was come again nothing to do with this issue for the rest of his career. but now it is becoming increasingly recognized on both sides of the aisle. as roger said. you know, you name the social pathology, whether it's dropping out of school, getting into trouble with the law, whatever. there is a strong correlation between that and growing up in a home without a father, particularly for voice and this gentleman right here. >> we will have to job is to close in just a couple of minutes. this is our next last question. >> hello
wants him disqualified because of his religion. he is a member of the mormon church. i leave it to you to imagine what such a precedent could do to our entire system of justice if judges can be either assigned or disqualified on the basis of religion. these next few items may make you laugh, but you will hurt a little, too. a former california superintendent of education, dr max rafferty, has uncovered a few items having to do with extremes in the battle of the sexes. the department of health, education and welfare has discovered that in one public school system, more boys than girls were being spanked. if the school system doesn't want a million dollars in federal aid to be withheld, it will henceforth spank girls and boys in exactly equal numbers. in woonsocket, rhode island, the city council has ruled that from now on those metal-covered holes in our streets we've long called manholes will henceforth be known as person holes. and in missoula, montana, a peeping tom ordinance is now a 'peeping person' law. well, that's all the desk cleaning for today. and as i indicated when i began,
freedom of religion, freedom of expression, independence of the judiciary. so i'm not sure that this is the way forward. one of the most dangerous parts in that constitution, that it opened the door for many controversial school of religious thoughts to seep through the legislative process and undermine the authority of the judiciary. >> warner: the constitution was approved by 64% of the national vote, but only a third of eligible voters had turned out. and in major cities like cairo, majorities voted "no." this morning, those divisions were still apparent in cairo. >> ( translated ): it will certainly lead to stability. we can now begin to move forward. investment can begin to come into egypt. what more do people want? >> ( translated ): we are very sad and we never wanted the situation to be this way. we never wanted just one political group to rule. we wanted there to be unity. >> warner: for now, legislative power rests with the country's upper house of parliament, which is dominated by islamists. it was seated today. >> ( translated ): with regards >> warner: parliame
a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek state about the construction and commitment. >> there is still resistance. well over 90% of greeks are orthodox christians. while many accept the moscow plan, many are opposed resentful of mass migration here. >> greece fought hundreds of centuries of terrorism -- of tyranny by muslims. we totally oppose this. >> pride in their own faith is clear, but can they resist the respect of the other? this is a country where religion is intrinsic to national identity, where church and state are intimately linked. the
about it as a church and as a religion and also because brigham young is such a figure of broad significance in the 19th century america. >> and the most famous today's mitt romney. does the romney family have interaction with the brigham young plan? >> i'm sure there are many descendants that know each other. the church is still a fairly tight knit institution and especially in utah it means a lot if you have ancestors that go way back to the pioneer era of the church. >> romney does as well. >> why did the family in that in mexico at one part? >> wealthy ended up in mexico because i believe mitt romney's great grandfather practiced marriage, she was a polygamist and later a part in the 1800's case serious effort to incarcerate more men men who produce polygamy and they went to mexico to escape persecution and i'm not an expert on the family history, but i believe mitt romney's great grandfather was among them. >> the wait until he had died before the out of the polygamists? >> it was out what putative is essentially made a federal crime in 1862. but the u.s. government doesn't
of gun ownership called for mental health care as a way to protect schools. >>> religion leaders prayed for peace and called for action to prevent gun violence. church members held sunday service then a town hall forum to answer questions and spark discussion. actor and activist danny glover and jeremiah wright. glover says the connecticut shooting has brought a problem dealt with daily, gun violence. >> daily in light of what has happened in newtown connecticut, don't you give up on me. because now it is time for you to act. >> a group of san francisco faith leaders met with leaders to discuss what they can do to help. they hope to have similar meetings in the months to come. >>> the key to solving bay area traffic problems could come from cell phone towers. a uc berkeley team says their study is the first that data from cell phone towers and gps devices have been used to track traffic and their research could be used to can cut down your drive time. stop and go traffic and break lights are part of life here. now researchers from uc berkeley have released a study that could ease traffi
, i would ask, has san francisco city attorney looked into this, the city's aligning with a religion, should they distance themselves on that grounds? >> thank you. are there other members of the public who wish to speak on this item, item number 5? seeing none, public comment is closed. do we have a motion? >> so moved. >> we have a motion to send this item forward with recommendation and we can do that without objection. thank you. item 6. >> item number 6, resolution establishing the appropriations limit for fy 2012-2013 pursuant to california constitution article xiii b. >> thank you very much for this item from the controller's office. we have [speaker not understood]. >> thank you, members of the committee. neil levinson, [speaker not understood] from the controller's office. i'll be very brief and happy to answer questions. this resolution before you is required by the california constitution and government code. each year the city needs to confirm its appropriations limit under the gan provisions. in this calculation we have done, it reflects through calculations allowed by t
take out representatives of the 5 major religions and do the same thing and we model in front of high school and middle school students how the faiths can sit down like we are sitting here today and have conversations about our commonalities but about our differences as well. many of the comments we get from students is, wow, you guys can sit up there and talk because most of the pictures our students see are the ones that have been playing across our screens the last 2 or 3 days. we hope by challenging that we can prevent bullying and harassment we've been seeing here today. >> thank you, amina stacy is manager of communications for the los angeles giants. >> if you think about what our mission is, you probably think our mission is to win the world series every year, which hopefully this year we're on the right track, but actually our mission statement, we just went through an exercise but our mission statement has always been to enrich the community through innovation. and it's very, i am very proud of the fact that the giants have been able to take that mission and bring it into
religion and politics with george will. next, a discussion on climate science, politics and global warming. panelists talked about what they think is next for the american west, texas, and north east due to climate change, and attitudes about science from the public. from the commonwealth club of california, this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you for coming. we are delighted to be here today. welcome to clement won, a conversation about climate energy. burning fossil fuels release [indiscernible] they accepted the the fundamentals of climates science. today, things are different. skeptics are winning the comic communication battle even as temperatures rise and the intensity increases worldwide. over the next hour, we will talk about high school physics and chemistry and how science has committed in the public realm. we are joined by three distinguished scientists. michael mann is the author of "hockey and the current war." and a student from stanford university. >> i should mention that bill is here on very short notice. thank you for stepping in on such short notice you pu
their religion. in fact, restrictions on baha'is extend far beyond their religious practices to further restrict their civil rights and their human rights. many members of the baha'i faith living in iran are even subject to harassment, to persecution by the regime and others with extensive reports of confiscation of property, restrictions on travel and raids on baha'i homes and businesses. the iranian government continues to arrest and detain baha'is based on their religious beliefs with at least 60 cases logged last year alone. the members of the national leadership of baha'is in iran arrested in 2008 and unfairly tried with minimal access to their defense attorneys are now serving a 20-year sentence for crimes, crimes including insulting religious sanctity and propaganda against the regime. the government maintains possession of many baha'i properties that were seized following the 1979 revolution, including holy places, cemeteries and historical sites. many of those properties have now been destroyed. baha'is are barred from leadership positions in the government and are only permits to enrol
that america is freedom. freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of enterprise, and freedom is special and rare. it's fragile. it needs production. so we've got teach history based not on what is in fashion, but what is important. why the pilgrims who came here. who jimmy doolittle was and what the 30 seconds over tokyo met. on the 40th anniversary of d day i read a letter from a woman who wrote to her father who fought over she said we will always remember and never forget what the boys of normandy did. let's help her keep her word. i'm worning of an eradication of the american memory that could result ultimately in the erosion of the american spirit. let's start with basics. more attention to american history and greater emphasis on sitting ruche l. let me offer lesson one. all great change in america begins at the dinner table. tomorrow night in the kitchen i hope the talk begins and children, if your parents haven't been teaching you what it means to be an american, let them know and nail them on it. that would be a very american thing to do. [applause] i want to thank staff
and religion t is widespread. there is frustration about it. as julie said there is a deep vein of frustration in the country. and i think that is what we are seeing, this this one case has sparked off, you know, this citizen's protest didn't come out of nowhere. it's not a new issue. there have been sexual violence against women in india for many, many decades. but i think the sense ever a new feeling of kind of liberation about being able to take to the streets and say something about it is why we are seeing so much action right now. >> when a woman overcomes her own misgivings, pressure from her own family, and actually goes to the police, what happens? are the accusations investigated? are the accused tried? >> well this is one of the bigger problems, ray. because first of all it has to be said that the vast majority of the rapes are not reported in india as all over the world. but especially in india because it is a huge that would. there is a cultural no-no against it. it can ruin your life, if are you raped will you not get married. you could be thrown out of your village. so that is th
said the west won the world not by the superiority of its idead of values or religion but by the superiority of its application of organized violence. and westerners often forget that fact. nonwesterners never do. so albright, justifiable that we can have this policy toward iraq, even though a half million died, and clinton passes the law that basically gives the opportunity for bush to go further with it when bush, after 9/11, with the invasion of iraq. so, we see a continuum. that's part of the point we're making. it's not democrats versus republicans. foreign policy is bipartisan and we see it as this -- these lines running from 1898 -- you can say 1846 with mexico -- but we're tracing from 1899 up to iraq and afghanistan and yemen, and to the current administration. >> a lot like great historian williams who argues empire is a way of life. you call your book "untold history of the united states now now and in some ways williams -- >> we're following that. that's been on -- standing on on the showereds of a lot of great historian. this is not really untold to unive
. >> it is a stable situation because my, what the obama administration's argument basically says, religion is entirely private matter. you're allowed to have your private little ritual in head inch a way rooms and synagogues and mosque but the second it enters the public square it has to be bent and contorted to fit whatever the government says it should do. so the, the obama administration doesn't talk about freedom of religion. it talks about freedom of worship which is distinction they think it is very important. it means you are allowed to do whatever you want religiously in private, but the second it touches the government square the government wins over religious conscience. >> what strikes me, and we've done this story before, the folks at hobby lobby are not just using this to avoid something. they appear to be incredibly sincere in their religious beliefs. >> yeah. i mean, there is no profit motive in here that i think is really meaningful. this is the biggest company so far to question the hhs mandate and, you know, i think people would understand it more viscerally if we were ta
of culture, race or religion or tribe there is some commonality. these are essential human truths and passions and truth and moral precepts. >> guest: in some ways that is a variation of what he said in a speech that made him famous in 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston where he said there are no red states or. states that the united states. that prevented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far he could take that. he has been dealing with the promise and frustrations of that idea ever since as i am sure we will both be experiencing when the telephone calls come for the show. >> host: your book ends in 1989, "barack obama: the story". you say there's another volume coming. >> guest: 40 years of robert caro who is one of my heroes, check that out on the down load. i have every intention -- i have a lot of reporting which influenced this first book even though they are not in it. i don't want to do quickie, i don't want my books -- i write them for history. there are a lot of docume
made sense is regardless of culture and race and religion, there is some commonality. the essential human truths and passions and hopes and moral precepts that are universal. >> guest: that is part of the speech that made him famous. the united states, not just red states and blue states. he presented himself as the personification of that notion. the presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far you can take that. so he could deal with the promise and frustrations of that idea ever since. as i'm sure we would both be experiencing in the telephone calls. >> host: so your book ends in 1989. he said there is another common? >> guest: i didn't want to get too ahead of myself, but i have every intention. i've done a lot of reporting through the years. i don't want to do a quickie. i don't write my books for the politics of the moment. >> host: the book ends in 1989. but at this point, barack obama, so far lived in seattle and 1962 until 1967, back to honolulu and then back to indonesia. 1967 to 1971, back to honolulu, 79 to 1981, los angeles and then he moved to new york for
themselves a religious organization. all they are doing is using religion as a false front. this is a criminal organization. they make their money by smuggling and kidnapping and through intimidation. there our family names of gangs. they have no real political motives that are good for any country. let alone a country so suffering is afghanistan. these people should not be allowed back to the government. but i am afraid because of the weak position that we have and the karzai government, everyone is saying that we need a political settlement. most wars, all wars end with completely defeated enemies or a negotiated position. in this case, it's going to be a negotiated position because we cannot defeat it. we just don't have the forces nor the political will to do so. harris: captain nash, thank you for your perspective today. >> my pleasure. jon: new york city is the safest big city in america. fewer workers per population than any other big town. the murder strikes again here is a man is pushed to his death in front of a subway train for the second time this month. the sea
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 64 (some duplicates have been removed)